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BecauseBecauseFor instanceBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseFor instanceBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseBecauseShould the USimplement vaccinepassports?YOU DECIDE!DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:1. Do you think that more people would get vaccinated if it wasrequired to go to certain restaurants, stadiums, or other publicplaces?2. The "CON" side claims that vaccine passports would makesocial inequalities worse. Do you find this persuasive? Why or whynot?3. Do you think that it is legitimate for people to resist getting thevaccine? Why or why not?4. Given how things are changing rapidly, how can you imagine yourviews changing in the coming months?YES: The government shoulduse every means possible tohelp us get safely out of thispandemicVaccine passports area means of protectingthe most vulnerablemembers of ourcommunityVaccine passportrequirements wouldhelp to ensure thateveryone in a venueor public space hasbeen vaccinatedEnsuring thevaccination of allpeople in a givenvenue would help toprotect people forwhom the vaccinedoes not provide fullimmunityFor many cancerpatients, transplantrecipients, and peoplereceiving treatmentfor autoimmunedisorders, the vaccinemay have limitedeffectivenessEssential andfrontline workers,such as teachers, busdrivers, and waiters,are at increased riskof getting COVIDVaccine passportscould offer theseworkers the securityof knowing that thecustomers orstudents they interactwith have beenvaccinatedVaccine passportswould enablebusinesses andvenues to open upmore quickly withoutposing a threat topublic healthIsrael's Green Passprogram has enabledrestaurants, musicvenues, event halls,and stadiums tobegin opening up topre-pandemicstandardsIn many industries,employees who workdirectly with thepublic have beenresistant to returningto work until peopleget vaccinatedTeachers' unionsacross the countryhave expressedconcern aboutreturning to in-person school until allstudents arevaccinatedMany travelcompanies, whichhave been entirelyshut down during thepandemic, arerequiring patrons andemployees to provideproof of vaccinationStandardizing orassisting companiesin making thesechecks would hastentheir return tobusinessAllowing businesses andvenues to requireverification of vaccinationcould incentivize morepeople to get the vaccineA substantial numberof people havedeclined or refused toget the vaccineAccording to a studyby the Center forDisease Research andPolicy, 1 in 4Americans areunwilling to bevaccinated againstCOVID-19Allowing businessesand venues to requirevaccination (andverification) to enteror participate couldconvince thesepeople to getvaccinatedSeveral participants ina recent focus groupof people hesitant toget vaccinated saidthat they wouldchange their minds ifit was required totravelIncentivizing or evenrequiring vaccinationhas proven to be aneffective means forimproving vaccinationrates (and eradicatingdisease) in AmericanhistoryIn the late 19th andearly 20th century,many businesses andvenues, includingfactories, mines,schools, and socialorganizations,required proof ofsmallpox vaccinationsfor all employees orguestsThe World HealthInstitute declaredsmallpox eradicatedin 1980There is a longstandingprecedent for vaccineverification in US historyThe Supreme Courthas upheld the rightof the governmentand other entities torequire proof ofvaccination forparticipation invarious activitiesIn Zucht v. King in1922, the SupremeCourt dismissed anappeal that a schooldistrict's requirementthat all studentsprovide proof ofsmallpox vaccinationviolated the 14thAmendmentIn Jacobson v.Massachusetts, theSupreme Court ruledthat a mandatoryvaccination law didnot violate the 14thAmendment rights ofcitizensMany countriesrequire proof ofyellow fevervaccinations from alltravelers (includingfrom the US)The US only ended itsmandate on universalsmallpox vaccinationsin 1972 when thedisease hadeffectively beeneradicated by a longbut ultimatelysuccessful mandatoryvaccination campaignNO: Vaccine passports and passesare more likely to worsen existingproblems than solve themVaccine passportswould exacerbateexisting inequalitiesin our societyCOVID vaccinationshave beenadministered athigher rates amongwhite and affluentcommunities thanother sections of thepopulationAcross the country,zip codes andcounties with highvaccination ratescorrelate stronglywith high incomeAttempts to getvaccine appointmentsare often limited byslow internetconnections orinability to travel longdistances tovaccination sitesAccording to a NewYork Times study ofstate vaccinationefforts, Blackpopulations werevaccinated at a lowerrate than the overallstate population inevery respondingstateHispanic communitiesare also vaccinated atlower rates than theoverall statepopulation in nearlyall statesGranting specialrights for thevaccinated, whiletightening restrictionson the unvaccinated,risks widening socialgapsIn Israel, the GreenPass has similarlyneglected Palestinianpopulations in theoccupied territories ofGaza and the WestBank, wherevaccination rates aremuch lower thanIsrael's overallpopulationCurrent initiatives forvaccine passports areprimarily a means forcorporations andbusinesses to makemoney, rather thanfor providing aservice aimed at thepublic goodCurrent proposals forvaccine passports inthe US are beingundertaken by privatecorporations ratherthan the governmentAccording to AndySlavitt, acting directorfor the Centers forMedicaid andMedicare Services,"The government isnot viewing its role asthe place to create apassport”While the purpose ofgovernment is atleast nominally toserve its citizens,private corporationsare responsibleinstead toshareholders andprimarily motivatedby profit rather thanthe public goodVaccine passportapps provide techcompanies withanother way oftracking the lifestyles,habits, and locationsof usersIn the rush to returnto life as normal,vaccine passportscould backfireMaking the onlyrequirement for anear return to life asnormal could create afalse sense of securityThere remains littledata about theeffectiveness of eachof the variousvaccines against thevarious strands andvariants of COVID, thelongevity of immunitygiven by each vaccine,and whethervaccinated people canstill transmit thedisease to othersNeither businessleaders nor publichealth experts areenthusiasticsupporters of avaccine passportsystemMany businesses areconcerned that proof-of-vaccinations effortscould alienate somecustomers, hurtrevenue, and evenlead to safetyconcernsAt businesses likerestaurants, whichhave remained openduring the pandemic,vaccine passportswould restrict thepool of potentialcustomersAccording to XiomaraPeña, vice presidentfor engagement atSmall BusinessMajority, the impactof a vaccine passportsystem is still to bedeterminedGeorges Benjamin,executive director ofthe American PublicHealth Association,argues that a vaccinepassport system is"impractical" and a"slippery slope"towards increasedresistance to vaccinerollout, exacerbatinginequities in thehealth care system,and creating a falsesense of securityamong vaccinatedpeopleBACKGROUND:The Washington Post recently reported that the Bidenadministration is working with private companies to developa standard way for verifying vaccine credentials, or what formonths have been called “vaccine passports.” Within days,Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota was tweeting about the“oppression” of Biden’s hypothetical program and Gov. RonDeSantis of Florida was issuing an executive orderprohibiting that state’s businesses from participating in it.How much of the rhetoric around vaccine passports ispartisan noise, and where are legitimate justifications andconcerns?

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