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For instanceShould schools,businesses, andrestaurants requireproof of vaccination?YOU DECIDE!1.1DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:1. Do you think more people would get vaccinated if it wasrequired to go to certain restaurants, stadiums, or other publicplaces?2. The "CON" side claims that requiring vaccines would be unfairto lower-income people. Do you find this persuasive? Why or whynot?3. Do you think that it is legitimate for people to resist getting thevaccine? Why or why not?4. Given how things are changing rapidly, how can you imagine yourviews changing in the coming months?YES: We should use every meanspossible to help us get safelyout of this pandemic1.3Requiring vaccines isa means of protectingthe most vulnerablemembers of ourcommunity2.1Vaccine requirementswould help to ensurethat everyone in avenue or public spacehas been vaccinated3.1Ensuring thevaccination of allpeople in a givenvenue would help toprotect people forwhom the vaccinedoes not providesufficient immunity3.2For many cancerpatients, transplantrecipients, and peoplereceiving treatmentfor autoimmunedisorders, thevaccines may havelimited effectiveness4.1Essential andfrontline workers,such as teachers, busdrivers, and waiters,are at increased riskof getting COVID3.3Requiring vaccinescould offer theseworkers the securityof knowing that thecustomers orstudents they interactwith have beenvaccinated3.4Requiring vaccineswould enable schoolsand businesses toopen up more fullywithout posing athreat to publichealth2.2As early as March,Israel's Green Passprogram enabledrestaurants, musicvenues, event halls,and stadiums tobegin opening up topre-pandemicstandards3.5In August, themassive music festivalLollapalooza was nota spreader event forCOVID, owing to 90%of attendees beingvaccinated3.6Teachers' unionsacross the countryhave expressedconcern aboutreturning to in-person school until allstudents arevaccinated3.7Businesses and venuesrequiring vaccination couldincentivize more people toget the vaccine2.3A substantial numberof people havedeclined or refused toget the vaccine3.8According to a studyby the Center forDisease Research andPolicy, 1 in 4Americans areunwilling to bevaccinated againstCOVID-194.2Allowing businessesand venues to requirevaccination to enteror participate couldconvince thesepeople to getvaccinated3.9Several participants ina focus group ofvaccine-hesitantpeople said that theywould change theirminds if it wasrequired to travel4.3Incentivizing or evenrequiring vaccinationhas proven to be aneffective means forimproving vaccinationrates (and eradicatingdisease) in Americanhistory3.10In the late 19th andearly 20th century,many businesses andvenues, includingfactories, mines,schools, and socialorganizations,required proof ofsmallpox vaccinationsfor all employees orguests4.4The World HealthInstitute declaredsmallpox eradicatedin 19804.5There is a longstandingprecedent for vaccinerequirements in UShistory2.4The Supreme Courthas upheld the rightof the governmentand other entities torequire proof ofvaccination forparticipation invarious activities3.11In Zucht v. King in1922, the SupremeCourt dismissed anappeal that a schooldistrict's requirementthat all studentsprovide proof ofsmallpox vaccinationviolated the 14thAmendment4.6In Jacobson v.Massachusetts, theSupreme Court ruledthat a mandatoryvaccination law didnot violate the 14thAmendment rights ofcitizens4.7Many countriesrequire proof ofyellow fevervaccinations from alltravelers (includingfrom the US)3.12The US only ended itsmandate on universalsmallpox vaccinationsin 1972 when thedisease hadeffectively beeneradicated by a longbut ultimatelysuccessful mandatoryvaccination campaign3.13BACKGROUND:In response to the rapidly spreading Delta variant, NYCMayor Bill de Blasio has announced that the City will requireproof of vaccination for a number of activities, includingindoor dining, gyms, and movie theaters.Meanwhile, hundreds of colleges (including Harvard) are alsorequiring that all staff and students on campus bevaccinated.Proponents say that vaccines are necessary to move societypast the pandemic and fully re-open. Critics point toconcerns about equity and privacy.1.2NO: Requiring vaccinations couldworsen existing problems ratherthan solve them1.4Requiringvaccinations could beunfair to lower-income people2.5More than half ofunvaccinatedAmericans live inhouseholds thatmake less than$50,000 annually,according to theCensus Bureau3.14"A lot of low-incomeworkers are workinghard to provide foodand housing," saidJulia Raifman, ahealth policyprofessor at BostonUniversity. "That maymean it's hard forthem to find a time toget vaccinated."3.15Workers also mayworry about having totake unpaid time off ifthey come down withany vaccine sideeffects3.16In the rush to end thepandemic, requiringvaccinations couldbackfire2.6Making vaccinationsthe only requirementfor nearly returningto "normal life" couldcreate a false sense ofsecurity that leadspeople to stop takingother importantmeasures, such aswearing masksindoors3.17Requiring the vaccinecould cause peoplewho are vaccine-resistant to furtherdig in their heels3.18Some businessleaders are notenthusiastic aboutrequiring vaccines2.7Many businesses areconcerned that proof-of-vaccinations effortscould alienate somecustomers, hurtrevenue, and evenlead to safetyconcerns3.19At businesses likerestaurants, bars, andstadiums, requiringvaccinations wouldrestrict the pool ofpotential customers3.20Requiringvaccinations couldviolate people'sprivacy2.8Vaccine passportapps provide techcompanies withanother way oftracking the lifestyles,habits, and locationsof users3.21

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